Jamaica

Landcare Runnings!   Landcare Runnings

Landcare Training in Hanover and Westmoreland Parishes, JAMAICA,
30 March to 2 April 2015.

Since it began in 1986, Landcare has been the most successful community-driven land restoration and conservation movement in Australia. Interest in Landcare has spread around the world, including to Jamaica.

Normally seen in fierce competition in a sports arena, English, Australian and Jamaican community members teamed up through Australian Landcare International to undertake training for local land managers and students about the Landcare approach.

About the Project:

Some seven years ago The Hanover & Wolverhampton Link Project flagged a Landcare training course in its home community in Jamaica run by Australian Landcare International, and finalised plans last year.

Hanover people see Landcare as a way to rehabilitate productive land after 300 years of subsistence and commercial farming. The region is growing rapidly due to tourism, however locals want to maintain some traditional farming industries, including fruit growing and vegetable production for sale to major resorts and restaurants. We hope training will lead to community-managed projects across the parish to conserve soil, control pest plants and animals, create carbon sinks and foster biodiversity, at the same time marketing high-quality produce co-operatively. Tourism opportunities such as farm-stay and ecotourism ventures may also be feasible.

Knockalva students

Knockalva students

 About The Hanover & Wolverhampton Link Project (HWLOP): Workshop-Flyer-2(1)HWLOP

The Hanover & Wolverhampton Link Project is a British-Jamaican charity group which brings together people of Jamaican descent to support economic, environmental, social, cultural and educational activities in Hanover Parish, near Montego Bay in Jamaica. Their forebears migrated from Hanover to Wolverhampton in the English Midlands from the 1940s to the 1960s. The Link team has also developed a warm relationship with Professor Mike Fullen, Professor of Soil Technology in the Biology and the Environment Faculty, The University of Wolverhampton. This project is also in collaboration Knockalva Agricultural College and the Westmoreland Bee Farmers Association.